July 2-8 Specials

We’re celebrating the July 4th all week long so make this week your golf week! Bring your friends, come out on the course, and have fun! We have special discount rates online!
Our best rate will be online this week!
See for yourself 

Wednesday, July 4th Specials

  • FREE GREEN FEES for Active Duty and Veterans playing 9 or 18 hole with cart on July 4th. Present military ID at the counter.
  • On Course Contests all day! We’ll have a longest drive for juniors, women, and men, and a closest to the pin competition! Take your best shot for some Pro V1s!

Phil Mickelson made an appearance in Chicago on Monday at a charity event in conjunction with the KPMG Women’s PGA Championship. Though the gathering was to focus on the tournament that begins Thursday at Kemper Lakes Golf Club, all focus remained on Mickelson and his curious decision to swat a moving ball at the U.S. Open.

Speaking to media, the 48-year-old continued to express regret for his actions that resonated well outside the Shinnecock confines.

“It took me a few days to kind of let my anger and frustration of the whole thing subside to where I could see clearer that it wasn’t the greatest moment,” Mickelson told reporters. “And since I apologized, the best thing I can do now is help promote the game in a positive way, which is why I’m here today.”

Mickelson, who is sponsored by KPMG, hosted a clinic for kids at Monday’s event while also tossing football with Bears quarterback Chase Daniel and shooting free throws with Bulls guard Kris Dunn and Sky guard Diamond DeShields. Mickelson later made an appearance with Golf Channel’s Todd Lewis, where he again apologized for the commotion.

“It wasn’t the right decision,” Mickelson told the Golf Channel. “It wasn’t the smart decision.”

When asked if he expected his legacy to take a hit, Mickelson acknowledged he hadn’t considered the ramifications, but sounded ready for the blowback.

“I certainly wasn’t thinking of that at the time, but I have pretty thick skin,” Mickelson said. “I will probably hear about this for some time.

“Fortunately, I can take it and hopefully at some point we will be able to laugh about it.”

Source: Golf Digest

Beginner Adult Clinics

Five clinics for $125 on either Fridays or Saturdays

10 – 11 AM

FRIDAYS

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Five Sessions With Doug White, PGA Professional!

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SOUTHAMPTON, N.Y. – In an ironic twist Sunday, the last man to win consecutive U.S. Opens was tasked with chronicling Brooks Koepka’s final round at Shinnecock Hills.

Carrying a microphone for Fox Sports, Curtis Strange kept his composure as the on-course reporter. He didn’t cough in Koepka’s downswing. Didn’t step on his ball in the fescue. Didn’t talk too loudly while Koepka lined up a putt.

Instead, Strange stood off to the side, clipboard covering his mouth, and watched in awe as Koepka stamped himself as the best U.S. Open player of this next generation.

And so after Koepka became the first player in 29 years to take consecutive Opens, Strange found himself fourth in the greeting line near the 18th green. He was behind Koepka’s playing competitor, Dustin Johnson. And he was behind Koepka’s father, Bob. And he was behind Koepka’s caddie, Ricky Elliott.

But there Strange was, standing on a sandy path leading to the clubhouse, ready to formally welcome Koepka into one of the most exclusive clubs in golf.

“Hell of a job, bud,” Strange barked in his ear, above the din. “Incredible.”

That Koepka prevailed on two wildly different layouts, and in totally different conditions, was even more satisfying.

Erin Hills, in Middle of Nowhere, Wis., was unlike any U.S. Open venue in recent memory. The wide-open fairways were lined with thick, deep fescue, but heavy rain early in the week and the absence of any significant wind turned golf’s toughest test into the Greater Milwaukee Open. Koepka bashed his way to a record-tying score (16 under par) and over the past year has never felt fully appreciated, in large part because of the weirdness of the USGA setup.

Source: Golf Channel

Give Dad the Gift Of Golf

Not sure what to get Dad this year? We have package deals already ready for you! Take a look at our Savings Card, Round of Golf with Lunch, or Round of Golf with Six Pack options!

__________

FATHER’S DAY SPECIALS

$50 Gift Card for $40

Get $10 FREE! It’s a savings of 20% you won’t want to miss out on. Buy now and save money!

__________

1 Lesson with the Pros

Purchase a 1 hour lesson and receive a FREE putting lesson (up to another half hour).

All majors are noteworthy, but it sure feels like this year’s are especially monumental. Part of that is surely due to the return of Tiger Woods (more on this shortly) and the level at which golf is being played across the board right now. The top 20 in the Official World Golf Rankings is an embarrassment of riches that includes, by my count, 13 golfers who are either already locks for the hall of fame or on the trajectory towards it. That’s insane.

It also leads to an abundance of storylines for the second major of the season. U.S. Opens are often known for their courses, but the prevailing theory this time around is that the course (which you can read about here) is going to play a secondary role to the players. Hopefully that’s the case after three straight years of consternation. Here are nine storylines to keep an eye on ahead of this year’s U.S. Open at Shinnecock.

1. Lefty’s slam: The first two storylines are also the most obvious. Here’s my take on Phil Mickelson: I think he has two more real chances to touch off the Grand Slam. He turns 48 on Saturday and will be 49 next year at Pebble Beach. After that, it’s Winged Foot, Torrey Pines, The Country Club and Los Angeles Country Club. Could Mickelson win a U.S. Open on one of those courses at age 50 or beyond? Sure, he could, but I think his last best chances are this year and next. That’s not exactly a hot take, but it’s worth noting, especially given the fact that his last two appearances at Shinnecock have both been top-five finishes.

2. Tiger’s last decade: This is my sixth year covering golf but just my third U.S. Open with Tiger Woods playing. He has been in the field just three times since 2010 and doesn’t have a top 20 finish. Still, he’s been splendid so far in his most recent comeback. He’s top 10 in strokes gained tee to green (within the range of players I expect to win this event) and obviously knows how to win U.S. Opens, which he last did 10 years ago. How much money could you have won by betting against Woods winning a major in the 10 years following that splendid one at Torrey Pines? For Tiger to get his first victory in five years at this place, in this tournament, might be too much to ask. Even for him.

3. Fowler’s first? I wanted to pick Rickie Fowler this week. I really did. I picked him for the Masters, and he almost made good on it. I couldn’t pull the trigger because Dustin Johnson might be playing chess to Fowler’s (and everyone else’s) checkers, but his quest as one of the handful of big time players without a major is fascinating.

The good news for Fowler is that this is a course that rewards patience and level-headedness, and maybe nobody on the PGA Tour is more patient and level-headed (at this talent level). He lacked the giddy-up he needed last year at Erin Hills after a crazy good first round. If he repeats those first round heroics in 2018, he can defend his way to major No. 1, and what a place to get it. Also, he has the best average finish (5.7) of any golfer over the last five U.S. Opens with at least three cuts made.

4. Spieth’s (so-called) struggles: Everything is relative, especially when you get into the range of top five players in the world. Jordan Spieth is No. 4 on the PGA Tour in strokes gained from tee to green. This is good. It’s in the class of players who could win this golf tournament. But he’s also not finished in the top 20 in any of his five events since the Masters and currently ranks No. 190 (!) in strokes gained putting. Cause for concern? Maybe, maybe not. But it’s certainly a massive talking point heading into the second major of the year. On the flip side, there’s this.

5. J.T. was the quietest No. 1: Justin Thomas was poised to enter this event as the seventh No. 1-ranked player in the world in the last seven years. Then Johnson torched the FedEx St. Jude Classic field for win No. 18 and took it back from him. Still, it feels like Thomas is flying in a little bit under the radar. I don’t know if he’s going to win this week, but it would definitely concern me if I’m in this field that one of the top two players in the world (who has somehow followed his elite 2017 year with one that’s nearly as impressive — if not more so — in 2018) isn’t really being talked about.

6. D.J.’s crown jewels: The No. 1 player in the world (again) is coming off a masterpiece at TPC Southwind in Memphis. Aside: You have to hole out your final shot of the tournament for a six-stroke win over Andrew Putnam to be considered a masterpiece. Now, he has a chance to win two U.S. Opens in three years and add Shinnecock to his embarrassing array of conquered courses: Riviera, Pebble Beach, Oakmont, Cog Hill, Doral, Crooked Stick.

Shinnecock’s variety is unparalleled in the United States. It requires every club and shot in a professional’s arsenal. Shinnecock is a course that won’t favor a particular style of play. It has enough width to allow the shorter player to use accuracy while not taking the driver out of the long player’s hands. The green complexes’ rolled-over edges and short grass surrounds create a razor thin margin of error.

The undulating fairways will produce a bevy of uneven lies that, coupled with ever-changing wind directions, will make it excruciating to control distances. A shot one yard from perfect can mercilessly tumble 30 yards away. The severe nature of the slopes of the greens will test a player’s touch and also command respect and thoughtful approach play. Shinnecock Hills will expose any and all flaws in a player’s game. It’s the finest major championship venue in the game because it asks the widest variety of questions to players. Shinnecock Hills will crown the week’s most well-rounded and skilled golfer.

7. Reed’s follow-up: Hey guys, remember me? The aftermath of Patrick Reed’s Masters win was about as quiet as it could have been given Reed’s age (27), nationality (American) and what could lay ahead of him (more majors). He flirted with contention last year at Erin Hills, and he could certainly do so again this year at Shinnecock. Can you imagine Reed holding a press conference at Carnoustie in a month with a pair of majors under his American flag-themed belt?

8. Ryder Cup implications: Such is the setup for Ryder Cup points that an American golfer can rise from deep in the rankings, win a major and catapult himself onto the team. These events provide so many Ryder Cup points that it would be nearly impossible for somebody like Jimmy Walker (15th), Luke List (20th) or Billy Horschel (23rd) to not make the team following a U.S. Open win. Keep that in mind when you’re staring at a third-round leaderboard that looks like our 2017 third-round leaderboard.

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9. Rory’s aggregation: Take any non-Tiger, non-Phil collection of three random golfers at the top of the world rankings, and it’s a pretty decent bet that Rory McIlroy has more majors than those three golfers combined. For example: Bubba Watson, Rickie Fowler and Jason Day (average world ranking: 12, combined majors: three). Or, say Justin Thomas, Dustin Johnson and Hideki Matsuyama (average world ranking: 4.3, combined majors: two). It’s really startling to think about the fact that, despite all the criticism he’s received and opining about gym work and putter woes, McIlroy still has four of these things. If he can add another U.S. Open, especially at a place like Shinnecock, especially before the age of 30, his status as an all-time legend will only grow.

Source: CBS Sports

2018 JUNIOR GOLF

Our Junior Golf Programs are taught by the most experienced and respected golf instructors in the area, with over 60 years of combined experience.  Our team is led by PGA Professional Doug White, and LPGA Professional Pat Gray. Other local qualified instructors will join our teaching team this summer to provide a camp that is both fun and committed to developing young golfers.

2018 Golf Camp Sessions

Camp meets Monday – Thursday, 8:30AM to 12:30PM.

Session 1 –  June 18 – June 21

Session 2 –  June 25 – June 28

Cost: $225 Per Session. 

Golf Academy: Register for the 10 Lesson Series, or Drop-In!

The Summer Series is the perfect program for families looking for golfing instruction throughout the Summer, and it is a great way to continue to develop the skills your kids learned during Junior Camp. Classes meet Tuesdays and Thursdays from 9:00AM to 10:30AM, and participants can either register for the entire class series, or they may register on a week to week basis.

Space is limited – register by Friday for Tuesday’s session, and by Monday for Thursday’s session.

During the Series, we will be teaching the fundamentals including: pre-swing and in-swing techniques, short game skills (putting, chipping, pitching, and bunker), course management, rules/etiquette, practice drills, and on course play. Recommended age: 8-16. Classes are taught by PGA Professional Doug White and LPGA Professional Pat Gray, and other trained professionals.

Class Dates: Class meets from 9:00AM to 10:30AM: July 10th, 12th, 17th, 19th, 24th, 26th, & 31st August 2nd, 7th & 9th.

Drop-In Cost: $25 per session

Series Price: $215

Register: https://lakeforest.golfems2.com/event/lake-forest-2018-junior-golf-summer-series

Give Dad the Gift Of Golf

Not sure what to get Dad this year? We have package deals already ready for you! Take a look at our Savings Card, Round of Golf with Lunch, or Round of Golf with Six Pack options!

__________

FATHER’S DAY SPECIALS

$50 Gift Card for $40

Get $10 FREE! It’s a savings of 20% you won’t want to miss out on. Buy now and save money!

__________

1 Lesson with the Pros

Purchase a 1 hour lesson and receive a FREE putting lesson (up to another half hour).

It’s Women’s Golf Day!

Here at Lake Forest, we’re celebrating all day! Women ride for the senior rate all day!

Watch Women’s Golf Day around the world:

Source: Golf Channel